This week Motivate became the nation’s first bike share company to join the American Public Transportation Association (APTA), the 133-year-old industry leader in nationwide advocacy for public transportation.

This move recognizes the role that Motivate’s large-scale bike share systems have come to play in cities – they are a fundamental part of urban transit networks, and they are offering a lower-cost, more flexible complement to traditional transit.

It’s also a sign of a larger shift in the transportation world away from thinking in siloes, and towards a vision for “shared mobility”. It’s a recognition that someone might use bike share to get to transit in the morning, walk to meet friends for dinner, and take Lyft, Uber or a taxi home. Increasingly, customers are expecting these connections to be seamless, and facilitated by the technology that’s already in their pockets.

APTA recognizes this, and is reaching out beyond the usual suspects to find new partners for their core transit members.

We want to partner with APTA to make sure that bike share and traditional transit can become more integrated, and our riders who use both can benefit. We think there are some big ways that transit agencies and bike share companies benefit from this as well.
For instance, bike share can help relieve pressure for parking at transit stops.

We’re in the midst of expanding our Bay Area Bike Share program from a 700-bike pilot to a 7,000-bike robust new transportation option. It will be the second largest bike share program in the United States. As part of that expansion, we will bring bike share to the East Bay for the first time and create a truly regional program that includes San Francisco, Oakland, Berkeley, Emeryville and San Jose.

The BABS expansion will allow commuters to get to BART without the metro system needing to add parking for extra cars or bikes. Adding bike share stations is much cheaper than adding additional car parking spaces or building a dedicated bike parking facility.

At the same time, we hear from our clients and our riders that they want us to be innovative in the ways that we integrate with transit.
They want to use just one card to swipe into transit or check out a bike.
They want to be able to use the same app to find a bike or check for the next bus.
They want to be able to use their Commuter Tax Benefits for bike share and transit and not have to choose one or the other.

We know that by working with APTA and partnering more closely with their member agencies we’ll be closer to achieving these goals, which require both technology and policy to happen.
We are honored to join APTA’s members who are leaders and innovators on the forefront of reinventing urban transit and shared mobility. By working cohesively with transit providers, Motivate will play its role in making sure tomorrow’s cities are built around unified and living transportation networks.

Motivate joins APTA — Motivate

Motivate joins APTA

This week Motivate became the nation’s first bike share company to join the American Public Transportation Association (APTA), the 133-year-old industry leader in nationwide advocacy for public transportation.

This move recognizes the role that Motivate’s large-scale bike share systems have come to play in cities – they are a fundamental part of urban transit networks, and they are offering a lower-cost, more flexible complement to traditional transit.

It’s also a sign of a larger shift in the transportation world away from thinking in siloes, and towards a vision for “shared mobility”. It’s a recognition that someone might use bike share to get to transit in the morning, walk to meet friends for dinner, and take Lyft, Uber or a taxi home. Increasingly, customers are expecting these connections to be seamless, and facilitated by the technology that’s already in their pockets.

APTA recognizes this, and is reaching out beyond the usual suspects to find new partners for their core transit members.

We want to partner with APTA to make sure that bike share and traditional transit can become more integrated, and our riders who use both can benefit. We think there are some big ways that transit agencies and bike share companies benefit from this as well.
For instance, bike share can help relieve pressure for parking at transit stops.

We’re in the midst of expanding our Bay Area Bike Share program from a 700-bike pilot to a 7,000-bike robust new transportation option. It will be the second largest bike share program in the United States. As part of that expansion, we will bring bike share to the East Bay for the first time and create a truly regional program that includes San Francisco, Oakland, Berkeley, Emeryville and San Jose.

The BABS expansion will allow commuters to get to BART without the metro system needing to add parking for extra cars or bikes. Adding bike share stations is much cheaper than adding additional car parking spaces or building a dedicated bike parking facility.

At the same time, we hear from our clients and our riders that they want us to be innovative in the ways that we integrate with transit.
They want to use just one card to swipe into transit or check out a bike.
They want to be able to use the same app to find a bike or check for the next bus.
They want to be able to use their Commuter Tax Benefits for bike share and transit and not have to choose one or the other.

We know that by working with APTA and partnering more closely with their member agencies we’ll be closer to achieving these goals, which require both technology and policy to happen.
We are honored to join APTA’s members who are leaders and innovators on the forefront of reinventing urban transit and shared mobility. By working cohesively with transit providers, Motivate will play its role in making sure tomorrow’s cities are built around unified and living transportation networks.