Advocates and policymakers have long positioned bike share as a new form of transit. Now this vision is becoming a reality.

This year Citi Bike broke records with 23 days over 60,000 trips and a peak ridership day of nearly 70,000 trips.

And Citi Bike is closing in on 13 million trips for the year. Compare that to San Jose, California, soon to benefit from the expansion of the Bay Area Bike Share, where unlinked trips on the light rail numbered approximately 11 million in fiscal year 2015, or Sacramento, which saw a little over 12 million trips on its own light rail system. Or consider bus trips in Louisville, KY, which totalled around 14 million.

Now imagine all (or the vast majority of) those trips in each city being taken on Citi Bikes. It’s a beautiful (and dizzying!) picture, no?

What these numbers say, unequivocally, is that bike share is on par with mainstream transit in our nation’s largest city, something that was unthinkable just a few short years ago, and they also point to its potential in cities across the nation.

A large-scale bike share system isn’t defined by the size of its fleet. It doesn’t have to have 10,000 bikes like Citi Bike to be considered large. It can be large relative to the size of your city.

What the above milestones do reinforce is that walkable station density and a large coverage area that serves both residential and commercial areas can lead to a thriving and well-utilized bike share program.  

Citi Bike Sets New Record Numbers of Trips, Setting Pace for the Industry — Motivate

Citi Bike Sets New Record Numbers of Trips, Setting Pace for the Industry

Advocates and policymakers have long positioned bike share as a new form of transit. Now this vision is becoming a reality.

This year Citi Bike broke records with 23 days over 60,000 trips and a peak ridership day of nearly 70,000 trips.

And Citi Bike is closing in on 13 million trips for the year. Compare that to San Jose, California, soon to benefit from the expansion of the Bay Area Bike Share, where unlinked trips on the light rail numbered approximately 11 million in fiscal year 2015, or Sacramento, which saw a little over 12 million trips on its own light rail system. Or consider bus trips in Louisville, KY, which totalled around 14 million.

Now imagine all (or the vast majority of) those trips in each city being taken on Citi Bikes. It’s a beautiful (and dizzying!) picture, no?

What these numbers say, unequivocally, is that bike share is on par with mainstream transit in our nation’s largest city, something that was unthinkable just a few short years ago, and they also point to its potential in cities across the nation.

A large-scale bike share system isn’t defined by the size of its fleet. It doesn’t have to have 10,000 bikes like Citi Bike to be considered large. It can be large relative to the size of your city.

What the above milestones do reinforce is that walkable station density and a large coverage area that serves both residential and commercial areas can lead to a thriving and well-utilized bike share program.