If it takes a village to raise a child, then it takes a warehouse, forklifts, big trucks, lots of vans, and hundreds of hard working New Yorkers to start up a bike share system that’s as awesome as Citi Bike. At least that’s what it looked like when we took a tour of the Greenpoint Warehouse earlier last week.Right now, about eight stations are being installed every day, which means things around the warehouse are pretty busy.Most of the work done there is completion and assembly, which boils down to putting a lot of pre-fabricated pieces together and making sure everything works as it’s supposed to. There are hundreds of partially constructed stations in the warehouse, which are configured to match their specific site and then loaded onto trucks and transported to their destination.A few fun facts that I picked up along the way: Citi Bike stations are not connected to the electrical grid. They use solar panels that store energy in marine-grade batteries for power.All the stations have an awesome way-finding map built in, which will be great for cyclists, but also tourists and directionally-challenged New Yorkers.Citi Bike stations aren’t sunk into the sidewalk or the street, so they don’t cause any damage. They rely on their considerable weight (between five and six tons per-station) to stay in the right place.It’s not just stations that are being assembled at the Greenpoint facility. There are thousands of Citi Bikes there too.Each goes through a 30-point inspection before it’s deemed ready for the road. Once it’s out on the street, a 20-point version of that same inspection will be repeated on every bike at least once a month to ensure the fleet is in tip-top shape.Did I mention there were lots of bikes? Lots and lots of bikes?Thanks to everyone at the Greenpoint warehouse for showing us around! You’re doing an amazing job.

Behind The Scenes: At the Citi Bike Greenpoint Warehouse — Motivate

Behind The Scenes: At the Citi Bike Greenpoint Warehouse

If it takes a village to raise a child, then it takes a warehouse, forklifts, big trucks, lots of vans, and hundreds of hard working New Yorkers to start up a bike share system that’s as awesome as Citi Bike. At least that’s what it looked like when we took a tour of the Greenpoint Warehouse earlier last week.Right now, about eight stations are being installed every day, which means things around the warehouse are pretty busy.Most of the work done there is completion and assembly, which boils down to putting a lot of pre-fabricated pieces together and making sure everything works as it’s supposed to. There are hundreds of partially constructed stations in the warehouse, which are configured to match their specific site and then loaded onto trucks and transported to their destination.A few fun facts that I picked up along the way: Citi Bike stations are not connected to the electrical grid. They use solar panels that store energy in marine-grade batteries for power.All the stations have an awesome way-finding map built in, which will be great for cyclists, but also tourists and directionally-challenged New Yorkers.Citi Bike stations aren’t sunk into the sidewalk or the street, so they don’t cause any damage. They rely on their considerable weight (between five and six tons per-station) to stay in the right place.It’s not just stations that are being assembled at the Greenpoint facility. There are thousands of Citi Bikes there too.Each goes through a 30-point inspection before it’s deemed ready for the road. Once it’s out on the street, a 20-point version of that same inspection will be repeated on every bike at least once a month to ensure the fleet is in tip-top shape.Did I mention there were lots of bikes? Lots and lots of bikes?Thanks to everyone at the Greenpoint warehouse for showing us around! You’re doing an amazing job.